November 29, 2021

Educt Geria

The Devoted Education Mavens

Top 10 arts events for Sarasota-Manatee: July 15-21

Venice Cabaret Festival returns

Venice Theatre launches a new season of its Summer Cabaret Festival at 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday with the return of John Lariviere presenting “The Sinatra Songbook.” Lariviere, a cabaret, concert and jazz singer performs around Florida and focuses on the Great American Songbook. “The Sinatra Songbook” features more than two dozen favorites by a singer considered to be one of the best voices of the 20th century. It features such hits as “I Get a Kick Out of You,” “My Way,” “Fly Me to the Moon” and more. Also this weekend, Dorian Boyd returns in his festival favorite act Dorian and the Furniture with a concert he calls “Tabled,” featuring an eclectic setlist of folk-rock music that he hasn’t had a chance to perform in past cabaret shows. The festival is presented in Pinky’s Cabaret (the Pinkerton Theatre) inside Venice Theatre, 140 W. Tampa Ave., Venice. Tickets are $25. For more information: 941-488-1115; venicetheatre.org

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A leap to London:Sarasota Ballet student earns scholarship to London’s Royal Ballet School

Mary Ann Carroll’s “Royal Poinciana on the Indian River” is part of an exhibition of work by the Highwaymen at Selby Gardens.

Highwaymen arrive at Selby Gardens

After the Pop art of Roy Lichtenstein, Selby Botanical Gardens is focusing on landscape works by the noted artists known as the Highwaymen. The new show “We Dream a World, African-American Landscape Painters of Mid-Century Florida, The Highwaymen” is on display in Selby’s Museum of Botany and the Arts through Sept. 26. It looks at the art and business enterprise used by the Black artists who overcame racial injustice to learn their craft and find a way to pay for their work. The exhibition also recognizes Zanobia Jefferson, an art teacher at Lincoln Park Academy, who helped to nurture the talents of young Black students. The exhibit is included with regular Selby admission at 1534 Mound St., Sarasota. For more information: selby.org

Kimberley Mullins, a creative writing teacher from Gainesville, is one of five Florida educators who are part of the Hermitage STARs program.

Teachers get creative at Hermitage

Each year, the Hermitage Artist Retreat and the Florida Alliance for Arts Education invite a group of Florida educators to take part in the annual State Teachers Artist Residency program, or STARs. They get to spend time on Manasota Key to focus on their own creative endeavors. And the public will have a chance to see what they’re working on with a hands-on, family-friendly showcase at 11 a.m. Saturday at 6660 Manasota Key Road, Englewood. The 2021 class features Megan Boehm, a painting instructor at Kissimmee Middle School; Kimberley Mullins, a creating writing instructor at Gainesville High School; Jennifer Rodriguez, a ceramics instructor at J.M. Tate Senior High School in Cantonment; Eric Troop, a music instructor at Bellalago Academy in Kissimmee; and Laura Wiswell, a painting instructor at Port Salerno Elementary in Stuart. To register for the event: hermitageartistretreat,org

Westcoast Black Theatre Troupe students rehearse for their Stage of Discovery summer camp show “The Technicolor Musical.”

WBTT students perform in ‘Technicolor’

Every summer, the Westcoast Black Theatre Troupe offers a summer musical theater camp it calls Stage of Discovery, which culminates with a performance. Last year’s show was presented as a video performance. But this year, the students will be live on stage (in front of a limited capacity audience) in the original show “The Technicolor Musical.” It features 17 songs designed to be uplifting and share a message of love, understanding, peace and harmony. The song list includes “Imagine,” “Man in the Mirror,” “Everybody is a Star.” The show was created, adpated and directed by founder and Artistic Director Nate Jacobs, who wrote the book with Adrienne Pitts. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the WBTT Theatre, 1012 N. Orange Ave., Sarasota. Capacity is limited to 50 percent and masks are required. Tickets are $27, $17 for students. For more information: 941-366-1505; westcoastblacktheatre.org

Arts Advocates opens a new gallery exhibition space to showcase work from its collection at The Crossings at Siesta Key mall.

Arts Advocates open new gallery space

For the first time since it was launched in 1969, Arts Advocates has a gallery where it can display its extensive collection of work by Florida artists and to host community events. The organization formerly known as the Fine Arts Society of Sarasota, will open its new Arts Advocates Gallery on Saturday in the Crossings at Siesta Key mall, 3501 S. Tamiami Trail, Sarasota, Suite 119. It will be open 2-5 p.m. Saturdays. The opening exhibit features Sarasota Art Colony pieces from the collection, including Jon Corbino’s “Palette,” which will be on view for the first time since it was stolen in 1991, when it was on display at the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall. It was recovered from a local estate sale. Docent tours are available at 11 a.m. on the first Wednesday of each month and cost $10. To book tours and for more information: artsadvocates.org

Michael Cheval’s painting “Imagine 3” is one of the works he will be displaying at the Wyland Gallery on St. Armands Circle.

A surreal look at the world

Contemporary artist Michael Cheval finds the absurdity in life in his paintings, drawings and portraits, or what he calls an inverted or reverse side of logic and reality. You can see samples of the work of the Russian-born artist when he visits the Wyland Gallery on St. Armands Circle, Friday and Saturday. Shop hours are 10 a.m. to 11 p.m. both days.  Cheval developed a love for art as a child before studying at the Ashgabad School of Fine Art in Turkmenistan and developing an independent career incorporating surrealistic influences. He moved to the United States in 1997. In addition to displaying his work, Cheval will be creating new pieces at Wyland Gallery. For more information: 941-388-5331; wylandgalleriesofthefloridakeys.com/wyland-gallery-sarasota-2

Sam Gilliam’s “Green Wave” from 1999 is featured in an exhibition of his work at The Ringling.

Ringling talks about putting it together 

The Ringling exhibition “Sam Gilliam: Selections” continues on display through Aug. 15, with artwork drawing primarily from local collections and focused on the artist’s work from the early 1970s to 2010. And you can learn more about the exhibition with a virtual gallery talk “Collaboration in Practice, Curating Sam Gilliam: Selections” at 10:30 a.m. Friday. Executive Director Steven High joins Marian Carpenter, associate director of collections and chief registrar for a look behind-the-scenes at what it took to bring together the different pieces. For more information: ringling.org/events/virtual-talks-lectures

From left, Jon Rossi, Justin Brown, Jason Cohen, Luke Darnell, and Nathan Yates Douglass in “Great Balls of Fire” at Florida Studio Theatre.

Curtains are up at FST Theatre

Florida Studio Theatre has quickly become the busiest arts venue in town, with four shows running on different stages. In the Keating Theatre, 1241 N. Palm Ave., Sarasota, is the rolling world premiere of “My Lord, What a Night,” by Deborah Brevoort. It tells the story of a night in 1937 when Marian Anderson performed a concert in Princeton, N.J., was refused a place to sleep at a local inn and was given shelter by scientist Albert Einstein. Also running are “Great Balls of Fire,” a cabaret salute to the career of rock legend Jerry Lee Lewis in the Court Cabaret, and “Life’s a Beach,” the Saturday night show offered by FST Improv in Bowne’s Lab Theatre. All are at 1265 First St., Sarasota. For information about all four shows: 941-366-9000; floridastudiotheatre.org

The Hongs perform for an outdoor party at the Sarasota Art Museum.

Party and art

There’s a party on the plaza at the Sarasota Art Museum of Ringling College from 6-8 p.m., in an event that explores musical notes, movement and engagement. Admission is $5 for museum members and Cross College Alliance faculty and staff, and $10 for non-members. Inside, the museum is presenting “Art and Race Matters: The Career of Robert Colescott.” It’s retrospective of the American contemporary artist’s six-decade career. The exhibition, on display through Oct. 21, features 54 works that deal with issues of race, gender, identity and the realities of life in the second half of the 20th century. The museum is at 1001 S. Tamiami Trail in the old Sarasota High School. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Wednesday-Saturday, and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. For more information: sarasotaartmuseum.org

Lauren Wickerson as Igor and Casey Berkery as Frederick Frankenstein in the Venice Theatre production of Mel Brooks’ “Young Frankenstein.”

A comical twist on ‘Frankenstein’

For the first time in more than a year, Venice Theatre is putting on a full production with its Summer Stock staging of “Young Frankenstein.” It’s Mel Brooks’ Broadway musical version of his iconic 1974 film about the young Frederick Frankenstein, who has inherited everything but wants nothing from his mad scientist grandfather, at least until he arrives in the family castle in Transylvania. The production stars Casey Berkery as Frederick, Charlie Kollar as the Monster, Lauren Wickerson as Igor, Belle Babcock as Inga and Natalie Taylor as Elizabeth. Brad Wages is the director and choreographer and Michelle Kasanofsky is the musical director. Final performances continue through Saturday at 140 W. Tampa Ave., Venice. 941-488-1115; venicetheatre.org